Learn a little about Wudang Tai Chi and Taoism

Purple Cloud Temple

Purple Cloud Temple

Check out this interesting video about The Secrets of Wudang Wushu. Got some good visuals of the temples I visited in the mountains of Wudang too. Wudang priests are rigorously trained in not only Tai Chi and Qigong, but harder martial arts like kungfu, and also the internal elements of qi movement. Plus, they are taught caligraphy, Taoism as a religion, healing techniques, and feng shui.

It was interesting to see so many non-Chinese studying there too. The West is finally getting really interested in ancient Chinese culture, and the benefits we can get from practicing.

World Tai Chi Day is almost here!

World Tai Chi Day is celebrated around the world at 10am local time.

Locally, Jan Stittleburg and Diana Dice, Tai Chi instructors, will be hosting the event at Mountain Park Park, 5050 Five Forks-Trickum Road, Lilburn 30047, at 10AM on Saturday April 28th. This will be the third year for this event in Lilburn. Last year about 20 people came to practice Tai Chi, lead by Jan and Diana. This year we are inviting all Tai Chi practitioners to come join us. Other teachers will have the opportunity to show and lead their style to the group as well. There is no cost to join us, just wear something comfortable and weather appropriate, and bring water to drink. We will be meeting on the Pounds Road side of the tennis courts, by the small child playground.

Come join the fun, even if you don’t know what Tai Chi really is. This a great opportunity to meet some members of the community and practice together, or just get an idea of what Tai Chi is.

 

Tai Chi in Action

Many people do not know that Tai Chi is based on martial arts, hand to hand combat skills. What we do is very structured and full of intent, each hand has a purpose and meaning in its movements.

This video of Wudang Tai Chi is one of the best videos I’ve watched to see the application of various forms. It would be even better if there was an English translation! Watch carefully as the teacher shows the form, then breaks apart the movements as an attacker approaches.

While Tai Chi in the United States is primarily taught for health benefits (relieving stress, toning the muscles, improving balance, lowering blood pressure, meditation in motion, etc.) when we learn the reason behind the movements and the purpose of each form, it has just that much more value. My classes are NOT intended to be self-defense classes, but just knowing the movements can add to your self-confidence and understanding. Your muscle memory may just surprise you in the moment of an attack.

World Tai Chi Day Celebration

We had 18 in total practicing together

We had 18 in total practicing together

The last Saturday in April is World Tai Chi Day. We celebrated in Lilburn’s Mountain Park Park with two teachers and their students sharing their formsets, and finishing with a tai chi sword demonstration by yours truly. We all had fun, and shared some good qi with each other! Many thanks to all who participated, Bernie Stittleburg and Diana Dice for the photography.

Measurable Benefits of Tai Chi

Why do we do Tai Chi – what are the benefits of Tai Chi? To an outsider, it may look like we are waving our hands around for no reason. We know that Tai Chi is based on ancient Chinese martial arts, and that each movement has an application or two, a purpose for each move. There are those who have studied the movements and say that one movement will help the energy in a particular meridian. But still, some people want scientific proof of our claims.

Part of Grasping Sparrow's Tail Sequence

Part of Grasping Sparrow’s Tail Sequence

(Running scored the lowest.)This article by Dr. Pete Gryffin talks about how Tai Chi is scientifically measurably good for you. He studied various activities, such as walking, running, resting, Yang style Tai Chi, Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail sequence in particular, and Qi walking. He looked at the blood oxygen saturation of the various activities, and found that doing the Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail sequence resulted in the highest increase in blood oxygen saturation. Qi Walking, Yang style Tai Chi scored the second and third highest increases in blood oxygen saturation.

He also states that one of the major complications in cancer treatment is hypoxia, which is an oxygen deficiency in the tissues. So it is logical to conclude that by adding Tai Chi to your life will help with cancer treatments.

According to Great Grand Master Kellen Chia, Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail also benefits the eliminative organs of the body, such as the large intestine, colon, and will also treat constipation.

Come to a class soon and learn this healthy and health-ful form!

Is Tai Chi a Martial Art or a Peaceful Meditation

balancing rocks on the beachA recent conversation on a LinkedIn forum discussed whether Tai Chi should be taught as a martial art, emphasizing the fighting aspects of the movements, or just as a gentle moving meditation. Certainly it is both, but how much does one lose by focusing only on the gentleness?

This quote by Peter Stephen Williamson struck me as how the martial art can be used in our daily life, without any actual fighting. “When we talk about “self defense” could we consider it as “defense against one’s own weaknesses, ego, desire, ambitions etc? Thus, if we look at ‘self’ defense, then we become calmer, find inner self-reliance and self-confidence, and subtly exude an aura of quiet confidence which may often preempt any potential “assault” – be it verbal, psychological or otherwise.

Like wise, when we face an “opponent” who feels intimidated by this aura, and who exhausts him / her self in heaping insults, we are able to “ward off” and be non-confrontational, and are able to continue our day without allowing such “assault” to stick to us.
When we have no consideration of “win” or “lose” are we not indominatable, undefeatable?”

This correlates to my own personal growth. Without having analyzed it to this extent, I’ve noticed that I am calmer when faced with an uneasy situation. Drivers who cut me off are let go without the curse and single finger salute of my younger, more aggressive self. I am better able to see the larger picture of, say, politics, without getting sidetracked by the obnoxiousness of one character. Knowing the yin and yang of situations, makes it much easier to stay centered. Being more balanced physically, I am also becoming more balanced emotionally.

More Performance Photos – Chen Style

Master Yang’s group also did the Chen Style 56 form set of Tai Chi at the Chinese New Year Festival in Chamblee. Remember to click the image to see a larger photo.

Happy New Year!

One of my teachers, Master Yang, was invited to showcase Tai Chi at the 2017 Chinese New Year Festival in Chamblee. Her group performed the 42 form set of Tai Chi, which is a compilation of the 5 northern forms of Tai Chi, including Chen, Yang, Wu, Sun and Hao. Here’s a few photos of this form, note you can click on any image and see the photo larger:

Finger Dexterity

Most of the hand movements in Tai Chi involve the whole hands, not individual finger motion. But that’s no reason to neglect your digits. Here’s a really cool video on finger exercises, designed in particular for musicians, but it can help us all.

Take your time, don’t try to do all the exercises fast and with lots of tension. Remember your Tai Chi training, breathe slowly and deeply, move gently at your own pace, and start with just a few if your hands are tight. Come back to this video every day for a week or two to do the whole set. Make a qigong set out of this, focusing on your energy flowing to your hands and through your fingers.

Don’t feel surprised if your fingers just don’t want to do some of the exercises. Just play with them, stay calm and enjoy a laugh at your incoordination. This too will get better in time. Be patient and just have some fun. Then when you get really good, like this guy, you can impress your friends and relatives!

Tips for bettering your Tai Chi practice

White Crane pose

White Crane spreading its wings in Hawaii

Your tai chi practice will improve greatly once your body learns to move gently, your breath slows down, you stop forcing the movements and learn to feel the natural movements. Basic skills of movement, made deeper by awareness of the body. Know where you have tension, that your body is rooted yet able to move gently and smoothly. This list is a great reminder of the first steps to improving your Tai Chi.

It’s not how deep your knees bend, how low you get to the ground, or how high you can kick. I used to admire the graceful long fingers of my teachers, thinking my hands would never look as graceful as theirs. I’ve come to realize it’s not the long thin fingers, but the internal grace of movement that I was missing. Feeling comfortable within my body, feeling the energy flow through the fingers and joints, rather than stressing the muscles to move.

Relaxing the fingers doesn’t mean leaving them limp, it means allowing the energy to flow naturally. Relaxing the body doesn’t mean slumping into a soft chair, it’s loosening up the tension in the muscles and joints. Allowing the body to breathe naturally, deeply.

Start with the breath, breathe slowly, deeply into the abdomen, a gentle, smooth even breath between inhale and exhale. Move in time with your breath if you can. Don’t hold your breath, or move too slowly that your breath doesn’t feel natural. When the breath is natural, add one movement, either a step, or an arm movement. Practice until that is as smooth as silk. Let the mind focus on being calm and still, feeling the body move. Take it one small bit at a time. When you are ready to add on, take another small bit and practice that. Slowly. Or as Alfredo Rolando Ortiz says, slowlier. Your practice should be at your own comfortable rhythm. Enjoy your practice!