World Tai Chi Day 2018 was a rousing Success!

Attendance at Mountain Park Park celebration of World Tai Chi Day 2018 in Lilburn doubled in size from last year, with teachers of Wudang, Yang and Chen styles leading the group in their forms. Plus a student of a Korean style of Tai Chi showed her moves.

Here’s the official, if somewhat amateur, video production and some photos of the event. Thanks to Diana Dice and Paula Sandlin and Lucy Ronkfor joining in the fun of leading the group! And especial gratitude to my husband Bernie for manning both video and still cameras. If you have any photos you’d like to share, please send them to me.


Below are a few of my favorite shots. If these are not enough for you, check out this gallery!

Diana Dice

Diana Dice

Jan doing the Wudang 49 form sword set


Jan doing the Wudang 49 form sword set

Jan doing the Wudang 49 form sword set

Paula Sandlin

Paula Sandlin

Lucy Ronk

Lucy Ronk

Can Qi cure cancer?

Startling headline, but according to studies, including those at Harvard, YES! I was listening to an interview with Joan Borysenko who mentioned a study with Harvard and qi healers. They had separated cancer cells from healthy cells, then introduced them to the power of an external qi healer. The normal cells showed very little change. The cancer cells had a much different reaction. The pathways used by cancer cells to grow and spread were inhibited, and the cancer cells actually died. In addition, cancer in their tests were affected by the qi up to 24 hours after the qi healer had left the room. Remarkable!
Practicing Tai Chi
So, I had to research this myself, to find documentation. I mean, if this is true, why isn’t this the standard cure for cancer? Why are we instead forced into a concoction of lethal drugs and radiation? I have not found that study yet, but I did come across this article, dating back to 1980. Here the author, Paul Gong, relates personal stories of people who were listed as beyond Western medical care, healing themselves by doing a regular practice of qigong. Their recommendation was 30-45 minutes a day of moving and meditation. In this article, Helen Liang, a Wushu master in China, resolved her cancer with qigong practice, and herbs prescribed by a Traditional Medical doctor. And I’ve previously posted about the measurable effects of Tai Chi showing the increased oxygenation of blood after doing Tai Chi versus walking, running and resting.

This website has a number of different links to articles about qi curing cancer. One easy practice includes doing the Tai Chi walk, letting your arms swing from side to side, and breathing in twice for every exhale. This is called xi xi hu, or inhale, inhale, exhale. It is a fun and relaxing walk, and very easy to do. Come to one of my classes, and we’ll practice it together.

Learn a little about Wudang Tai Chi and Taoism

Purple Cloud Temple

Purple Cloud Temple

Check out this interesting video about The Secrets of Wudang Wushu. Got some good visuals of the temples I visited in the mountains of Wudang too. Wudang priests are rigorously trained in not only Tai Chi and Qigong, but harder martial arts like kungfu, and also the internal elements of qi movement. Plus, they are taught caligraphy, Taoism as a religion, healing techniques, and feng shui.

It was interesting to see so many non-Chinese studying there too. The West is finally getting really interested in ancient Chinese culture, and the benefits we can get from practicing.

World Tai Chi Day is almost here!

World Tai Chi Day is celebrated around the world at 10am local time.

Locally, Jan Stittleburg and Diana Dice, Tai Chi instructors, will be hosting the event at Mountain Park Park, 5050 Five Forks-Trickum Road, Lilburn 30047, at 10AM on Saturday April 28th. This will be the third year for this event in Lilburn. Last year about 20 people came to practice Tai Chi, lead by Jan and Diana. This year we are inviting all Tai Chi practitioners to come join us. Other teachers will have the opportunity to show and lead their style to the group as well. There is no cost to join us, just wear something comfortable and weather appropriate, and bring water to drink. We will be meeting on the Pounds Road side of the tennis courts, by the small child playground.

Come join the fun, even if you don’t know what Tai Chi really is. This a great opportunity to meet some members of the community and practice together, or just get an idea of what Tai Chi is.

 

Tai Chi in Action

Many people do not know that Tai Chi is based on martial arts, hand to hand combat skills. What we do is very structured and full of intent, each hand has a purpose and meaning in its movements.

This video of Wudang Tai Chi is one of the best videos I’ve watched to see the application of various forms. It would be even better if there was an English translation! Watch carefully as the teacher shows the form, then breaks apart the movements as an attacker approaches.

While Tai Chi in the United States is primarily taught for health benefits (relieving stress, toning the muscles, improving balance, lowering blood pressure, meditation in motion, etc.) when we learn the reason behind the movements and the purpose of each form, it has just that much more value. My classes are NOT intended to be self-defense classes, but just knowing the movements can add to your self-confidence and understanding. Your muscle memory may just surprise you in the moment of an attack.

World Tai Chi Day Celebration

We had 18 in total practicing together

We had 18 in total practicing together

The last Saturday in April is World Tai Chi Day. We celebrated in Lilburn’s Mountain Park Park with two teachers and their students sharing their formsets, and finishing with a tai chi sword demonstration by yours truly. We all had fun, and shared some good qi with each other! Many thanks to all who participated, Bernie Stittleburg and Diana Dice for the photography.

Measurable Benefits of Tai Chi

Why do we do Tai Chi – what are the benefits of Tai Chi? To an outsider, it may look like we are waving our hands around for no reason. We know that Tai Chi is based on ancient Chinese martial arts, and that each movement has an application or two, a purpose for each move. There are those who have studied the movements and say that one movement will help the energy in a particular meridian. But still, some people want scientific proof of our claims.

Part of Grasping Sparrow's Tail Sequence

Part of Grasping Sparrow’s Tail Sequence

(Running scored the lowest.)This article by Dr. Pete Gryffin talks about how Tai Chi is scientifically measurably good for you. He studied various activities, such as walking, running, resting, Yang style Tai Chi, Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail sequence in particular, and Qi walking. He looked at the blood oxygen saturation of the various activities, and found that doing the Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail sequence resulted in the highest increase in blood oxygen saturation. Qi Walking, Yang style Tai Chi scored the second and third highest increases in blood oxygen saturation.

He also states that one of the major complications in cancer treatment is hypoxia, which is an oxygen deficiency in the tissues. So it is logical to conclude that by adding Tai Chi to your life will help with cancer treatments.

According to Great Grand Master Kellen Chia, Grasping the Sparrow’s Tail also benefits the eliminative organs of the body, such as the large intestine, colon, and will also treat constipation.

Come to a class soon and learn this healthy and health-ful form!

Is Tai Chi a Martial Art or a Peaceful Meditation

balancing rocks on the beachA recent conversation on a LinkedIn forum discussed whether Tai Chi should be taught as a martial art, emphasizing the fighting aspects of the movements, or just as a gentle moving meditation. Certainly it is both, but how much does one lose by focusing only on the gentleness?

This quote by Peter Stephen Williamson struck me as how the martial art can be used in our daily life, without any actual fighting. “When we talk about “self defense” could we consider it as “defense against one’s own weaknesses, ego, desire, ambitions etc? Thus, if we look at ‘self’ defense, then we become calmer, find inner self-reliance and self-confidence, and subtly exude an aura of quiet confidence which may often preempt any potential “assault” – be it verbal, psychological or otherwise.

Like wise, when we face an “opponent” who feels intimidated by this aura, and who exhausts him / her self in heaping insults, we are able to “ward off” and be non-confrontational, and are able to continue our day without allowing such “assault” to stick to us.
When we have no consideration of “win” or “lose” are we not indominatable, undefeatable?”

This correlates to my own personal growth. Without having analyzed it to this extent, I’ve noticed that I am calmer when faced with an uneasy situation. Drivers who cut me off are let go without the curse and single finger salute of my younger, more aggressive self. I am better able to see the larger picture of, say, politics, without getting sidetracked by the obnoxiousness of one character. Knowing the yin and yang of situations, makes it much easier to stay centered. Being more balanced physically, I am also becoming more balanced emotionally.

More Performance Photos – Chen Style

Master Yang’s group also did the Chen Style 56 form set of Tai Chi at the Chinese New Year Festival in Chamblee. Remember to click the image to see a larger photo.

Happy New Year!

One of my teachers, Master Yang, was invited to showcase Tai Chi at the 2017 Chinese New Year Festival in Chamblee. Her group performed the 42 form set of Tai Chi, which is a compilation of the 5 northern forms of Tai Chi, including Chen, Yang, Wu, Sun and Hao. Here’s a few photos of this form, note you can click on any image and see the photo larger: